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Joel Kotkin News Clips


Governing local is governing best

“Many on the left embrace the ideal of localism as a reaction against globalization and domination by large corporations,” Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox write in “Our Town: Restoring Localism,” a paper published in September by the Center for Opportunity Urbanism in Houston, Texas. Many progressive social causes, they point out — such as racial integration, gay marriage and marijuana legalization — were first adopted locally before spreading to other areas.

Joel Kotkin Makes a Plea for 'Localism'

Joel Kotkin swears he doesn’t hate cities—it’s just that most urbanists have a misguided perspective on them. Why focus on city centers, where populations tend to be too young, poor, and transient to invest in property or politics?

The Rise of Donald Trump

Joel recently joined the SpikedOnline podcast to talk about the rise of Donald Trump and the U.S. election. Follow the link below to listen. Joel's portion begins at about 14:30 of the show.

What Will Happen to Trump Supporters After the Election?

Joel recently joined the Rod Arquette show to talk about the impact of the Trump campaign and how his supporters might react to the election results. Download the mp3 to listen.

Center for Opportunity Urbanism: America’s Housing Crisis

This video from Center for Opportunity Urbanism (COU) explores America’s housing crisis --- focusing on the new generation. COU is a non-profit dedicated to preserving the American dream and promoting upward mobility for all Americans. Check out the video and let us know what you think.

Dreaming of Robber Barons

Joel joins KABC Radio in Los Angeles to talk about the impact of the high-tech oligarchs on today's society. Download the .mp3 to listen.

Discussing the Human City

Joel recently kicked off The Aspen Institute's McCloskey Speaker Series
with a wide ranging conversation about cities across the world. Watch the entire conversation in the video below.

Childless cities present a new urban challenge across the world

In his 2016 book The Human City: Urbanism for the Rest of Us, Joel Kotkin, a fellow in urban studies at Chapman University in California, mapped the phenomenon in the US. In San Francisco, he noted, there are 80,000 more dogs than children. The city has the highest number of households without children aged 18 or under of all core cities in the US. Kotkin also noted that the 2010 census found Chicago’s “overall population fell by seven percent, but its share of people aged five to 19 fell by 19 percent”. Similar trends can be found in other cities, including New York and Boston.

The Evolution of Urbanism

Joel recently appeared on Aspen TV's "The Lift" to talk about trends in urbanism and city development. Watch the video below:

Joel Kicks Off McCloskey Speaker Series

Joel kicked off the McCloskey Speaker Series in Aspen. The interview is now available on Aspen Public Radio:

Kotkin discussed his newest book, The Human City: Urbanism for the Rest of Us, which challenges the way we think about our cities. Instead of the conventional urban-planning strategy of high-density cities, he favors a decentralized, more sustainable alternative.

Follow the link below to listen.

Kotkin on who made Trump and Brexit: Look in the mirror, it's you

Kotkin’s piercing analysis may be of particular interest to Reg readers as he explains the role of figures such as Google and Facebook in shaping an agenda that isn't just hostile to the traditional working class – it’s hostile to the Enlightenment conception of the human being.

Pros and Cons of Chicago-Style Living

Joel recently spoke with Chcago's Morning Shift radio show to talk about the pros and cons of dense city living. Follow the link below to listen.

Bernie 'Wins' California

Joel Kotkin, a presidential fellow at Chapman University and the executive director of the Center for Opportunity Urbanism, calls California’s progressive economy the “new feudalism.”

“In practice,” Mr. Kotkin says, “it makes upward mobility very difficult and hurts the very people it claims to help.”

Where America is Working

The second kind of cities we might call Joel Kotkin cities, after the writer who champions them. These are opportunity cities like Houston, Dallas and Salt Lake City. These places are less regulated, so it’s easier to start a business. They are sprawling with easy, hodgepodge housing construction, so the cost of living is low. Immigrants flock to them.

As Kotkin and Tory Gattis pointed out in an essay in The City Journal, Houston has been a boomtown for the past two decades.

Despotism in America

Joel talks about the combination of ideology and special interests risking shift towards political despotism in America. Download the .mp3 file below to listen.

Joel on Reason.tv

Watch the full sized video at Reason.com.


Watch Joel in this feature on the role of central planning in Los Angeles. View large version.

Interview on Smartplanet.com

"Greenurbia is the suburbs of the future. The suburbs of the 1950s were bedroom communities for people who commuted into the city. Today, there’s much more employment in the suburbs, and the big change is the number of people working full-time or part-time at home. Having people commute from one computer screen to another doesn’t make sense."

Read the full interview...

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Praise for The Next Hundred Million

Kotkin has a striking ability to envision how global forces will shape daily family life, and his conclusions can be thought-provoking as well as counterintuitive. It's amazing there isn't more public discussion about the enormous changes ahead, and reassuring to have this talented thinker on the case. — Jennifer Ludden, NPR national desk correspondent

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